Saturday, February 28, 2015
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Judy Boyce My name is Judi Boyce. I am a retired Culinary Specialist Seaman, and I am a wounded warrior. I don’t fit the traditional definition of a wounded warrior. I was not wounded in combat. In 2008, I was diagnosed with Moyamoya disease, a rare, progressive cerebrovascular disorder. I had joined the Navy two years earlier, but, after my diagnosis, my military career was cut short. My illness – and the brain surgeries that accompanied it – had a profound impact on my life in many ways.
Red Ramos Growing up with two older brothers and a younger step-brother, life has always been competitive, in a one-up-you kind of way. We were always trying to outdo each other and giving each other grief when one of us didn’t live up to our own hype.
Michael Dayton My accident occurred in 2007, on St. Patrick’s Day, of all days. I was working in the engine room aboard the USS Emory S. Land, completing repairs to a pump on a fresh-water collection tank, when a steam-relief valve opened above me. I was blasted with 650-degree dry steam at greater than 150 psi (pounds per square inch). It was seven seconds of pure agony.
Jessica Landeros My name is Jessica Landeros. For many years, I was known as UT2 (SCW) “Can Do!” Jessica Mudgett. I am a wife and a mother. But I also am a recently retired Sailor. And not a day goes by that I don’t sincerely miss my identity as a Navy Seabee. I will never forget when that Navy ball cap was first placed on my head at Great Lakes back in 2002. I was so proud to become a Sailor that I held back tears when the Recruit Division Commander first called me “shipmate.”
John Dusseau I turned a corner sometime during my 10th or 11th chemotherapy session. My body and mind had remained fairly strong throughout a very tough treatment schedule, and I finally realized that I could make it because I might just have a fighting chance. In March 2011, I was diagnosed with Ewing Sarcoma, a rare cancer that typically develops in the bones of children.

Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor

When a Sailor or Coast Guardsman falls ill or is seriously wounded or injured in combat, in training, or in direct support of a military unit, few families are prepared to deal with the personal and financial disruption associated with leaving their home, their family, and their job to be with their loved one through long months of hospitalization, rehabilitation, and recuperation. Navy Safe Harbor Foundation aims to ensure that every service member is given an opportunity for full recovery. Navy Wounded Warrior coordinates the non-medical care of seriously wounded, ill and injured Sailors and Coast Guardsmen, and provides resources and support to their families. Through proactive leadership, NWW offers individually-tailored assistance to ensure enrollees’ successful recovery, rehabilitation and reintegration. Enrollment in the program is available to service members wounded in combat, as well as to those diagnosed with a serious illness or injured in shipboard, training and liberty accidents. Enrollment lasts a lifetime.

"I can think of few more important priorities than supporting our seriously wounded, ill and injured Sailors and Coast Guardsmen. These men and women have sacrificed so much for each of us, and for our country. It is our sacred duty to care, provide and advocate for them, ensuring they can lead the fullest lives possible." -- Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan W. Greenert

Anchor Program

The Anchor Program helps Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor carry out its promise to provide transition assistance to seriously wounded, ill, and injured Sailors and Coast Guardsmen, as well as their families. It provides them with an invaluable network of support during a critical chapter of their lives – the conclusion of their military careers. Though participating in the Anchor Program is purely voluntary, Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor urges all of its enrollees to take advantage of this important service.

Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor
Toll-free, 24-hour telephone number: 1-855-628-9997
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

What Can Navy Leadership Do?

  • Visit the bedside of wounded warriors recovering at medical treatment facilities near you.
  • Discuss warrior care issues and Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor in All Hands meetings or briefs.
  • Engage the chiefs’ mess or wardroom at your command.

Combat Veterans

Veterans who served in a theater of combat operations after November 11, 1998 are eligible for an extended period of eligibility for health care for 5 years post discharge. Under the "Combat Veteran" authority, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provides health care services and community living care for any condition possibly related to the Veterans service in the theater of operations and enrollment in Priority Group 6, unless eligible for enrollment in a higher priority group to: Combat Veterans who were discharged or released from active service on or after January 28, 2003, are eligible to enroll in the VA health care system for 5 years from the date of discharge or release. The 5-year enrollment period begins on the discharge or separation date of the service member from active duty military service, or in the case of multiple call-ups, the most recent discharge date. Combat Veterans, while not required to disclose their income information, may do so to determine their eligibility for a higher priority status, beneficiary travel benefits, and exemption of copays for care unrelated to their military service.

Your service has earned your access to enhanced VA health care benefits. In order to take advantage of these benefits, OEF/OIF/OND Veterans need to enroll in VA's health care system. Don't delay, apply today!

Combat Stress Echos Video - 10 Minutes

Family Support at Vet Centers — If you have served in ANY combat zone, local Vet Centers can help you and your family with readjustment counseling and outreach services — for free.

College Education — VA pays benefits to eligible Veterans, reservists and active duty service members to support your continuing education goals, including for on-the-job training, apprenticeships and non-college degree programs. Learn about the Post 9/11 GI Bill today.

180 Day Dental Benefit — OEF/OIF combat Veterans may be eligible for one-time dental care — but you must apply with 180 days of your separation date from active duty.

Find HelpAm I eligible? VA regional offices can help you with completing and filing the right VA forms. Find out where your local VA OEF/OIF Team is located.

Documentation Used To Determine Service in a Theater Of Combat Operations

Veterans may assist VA in establishing their status as a combat Veteran by providing one of the following when they apply for care:

  • Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty (DD 214) indicating service in a theater of combat operations
  • Proof of receipt of the Afghanistan Campaign Medal; Iraq Campaign Medal; Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal; Air Force Combat Action Medal (AFCAM); Kosovo Campaign Medal; Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal (does not include Global War on Terrorism Service Medal); or Southwest Asia Service Medal.
  • Proof of receipt of Hostile Fire or Imminent Danger Pay (commonly referred to as "combat pay") after November 11, 1998
  • Proof of exemption of Federal tax status for Hostile Fire or Imminent Danger Pay after November 11, 1998.

Health Benefits Under The "Combat Veteran" Authority

  • Medical care and medications provided for conditions potentially related to combat service
  • Enrollment in Priority Group 6 unless eligible for enrollment in a higher priority group
  • Full access to VA's Medical Benefits Package
Navy Medicine is a global healthcare network of 63,000 Navy medical personnel around the world who provide high quality health care to more than one million eligible beneficiaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield. - See more at: http://navymedicine.navylive.dodlive.mil/#sthash.YUdsDzat.dpu

THE LIVING HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY

"And the living have a responsibility to remember the conditions that led to the wars in which our heroes died. Perhaps we can start by remembering this: that all of those who died for us and our country were, in one way or another, victims of a peace process that failed; victims of a decision to forget certain things; to forget, for instance, that the surest way to keep a peace going is to stay strong. Weakness, after all, is a temptation -- it tempts the pugnacious to assert themselves -- but strength is a declaration that cannot be misunderstood. Strength is a condition that declares actions have consequences. Strength is a prudent warning to the belligerent that aggression need not go unanswered." --President Ronald Reagan, 11NOV1985

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HONOR & APPRECIATION

NAVY WOUNDED WARRIOR - SAFE HARBOR

"The Navy is better off for having a partner in the care of our seriously wounded, ill, and injured Sailors and Coast Guardsmen. The Navy Safe Harbor Foundation’s mission and supported population is closely aligned to that of our own; which increases speed of resources and support to our population’s needs while ensuring no one is left without support." --VADM James F. Amerault, USN (Ret) Chairman Emeritus, Navy Safe Harbor Foundation

PRESS ROOM - Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor serves as a primary source of information about the support provided seriously wounded, ill, and injured Sailors, Coast Guardsmen, and their families.

Several wounded warriors have offered to share their stories on Navy Live, the official blog of the U.S. Navy. Check out their entries below.

- Judi Boyce’s Story
- Red Ramos’ Story
- Michael Dayton’s Story
- Jessica Mudgett’s Story
- John Dusseau’s Story
- Jean Scherrer’s Story
- Sonny Lemerande‘s Story
- Javier Rodriguez Santiago’s Story
- Brett Parks’s Story
Paul Johnson’s Story
- Laura Root’s Story
- Shericka Goza’s Story

Press Room Archives

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Inspired by the military community, Navy Safe Harbor Foundation was created to efficiently identify and meet the needs of recovering Sailors, Coast Guardsmen, Merchant Marines and their families. NSHF will fill the gaps of current nonmedical provisions through collaboration with federal and community resources. NSHF wants to ensure that every service member is given an opportunity for full recovery by providing financial assistance, respite care, special equipment, transportation, recreational opportunities, and other services.

STORMS OF BATTLE

"Honor to the Soldier, and Sailor everywhere, who bravely bears his country's cause. Honor also to the citizen who cares for his brother in the field, and serves, as he best can, the same cause -- honor to him, only less than to him, who braves, for the common good, the storms of heaven and the storms of battle." President Abraham Lincoln 02DEC1863

Sailors and Coast Guardsmen may self-refer to the program or be referred by family, command leadership, or medical providers. For questions about enrollment eligibility, call Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor’s toll-free line, 855-NAVY WWP (628-9997), or email navywoundedwarrior@navy.mil.

WHOSE FACE IS MARRED BY DUST AND SWEAT AND BLOOD

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." --President Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt, 23APR1910

Social Security Disability Benefits for Wounded Warriors

Fisher House Foundation

Hero Miles

TRICARE Resources for Injured Service Members

Fleet and Family Readiness

eBenefits National Resource Directory

United States Marine Corps Wounded Warrior Regiment

United States Army Wounded Warrior Program (AW2)

United States Air Force Wounded Warrior

Inspired by the military community, Navy Safe Harbor Foundation was created to efficiently identify and meet the needs of recovering Sailors, Coast Guardsmen, Merchant Marines and their families. NSHF will fill the gaps of current nonmedical provisions through collaboration with federal and community resources. NSHF wants to ensure that every service member is given an opportunity for full recovery by providing financial assistance, respite care, special equipment, transportation, recreational opportunities, and other services. The Navy Safe Harbor Foundation is dedicated to supporting the recovery of seriously wounded, ill, and injured Sailors, Coast Guardsmen, and their families by assisting them with resources not currently provided by government or community resources.

The Navy Safe Harbor Foundation (NSHF) is an IRS recognized 501(c)3 tax-exempt non-profit organization.

NSHF © 2013 – The NSHF is not affiliated with the United States Navy, Coast Guard or Department of Defense.

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The Veterans Crisis Line connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text. Veterans and their loved ones can call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online, or send a text message to 838255 to receive confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Support for deaf and hard of hearing individuals is available.